Care at Duke’s Art Annexe

Posted: July 28th, 2019 | Author: A.D. | Filed under: ANTHROPOLOGIE — réflexions croisées sur un monde qui bouge | No Comments »

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#CARE

A one week residency for practice base research experimentation

The goal of the weeklong workshop is to generate an argumentative collection of images, maps, drawings, videos and photographs of what ‘care’ represents to the participants.
Each day participants will engage in fieldwork to collect these elements.
The collections will be accompanied by a supporting production of notes, poems, texts or any kind of annotated description of their collection fieldwork experience.
At the end of the week, everyone gets:
1. a photograph, a text, a drawing or a trans-media collection.
2. a complete text to explain the work, that integrates the day to day texts accompanying each element/item.
3. a map of his/her own process and representation of his/her own thematics.
Every evening, a collective meeting will be convened to share the items collected and discuss to further issues.

N. B. The one week workshop production will be held at Duke’s Art Annex.


About CARE

How can the idea, concept and notion of CARE be depicted?
The first part of this proposal takes the form of an intensive workshop, directly addressing representations of ‘care’.

Participants come up with a subject about various topics associated to care for them:
- Environmental care such as concern for the natural world, animals, plants or, environmental issues.
- The notion of dwelling can be approached such as how to care for one’s household. Or assisted or domestic care can also be depicted (i.e. for old people, blind or disabled people, or pediatric).
- Holistic or physical care: dance, body techniques such as yoga, martial arts, singing, sports, etc.
- Communicative care: Everyday life gestures that exhibit compassion, concern or empathetic consideration.
- Clinical or psychological care: health, newborn, hospital, clinic, mental health.
- Societal care: Public spaces such as streets, communal gardens and parks. The goal of the weeklong workshop is to generate an argumentative collection of images, maps, drawings, videos and photographs of what ‘care’ represents to the participants.

Each day participants will engage in fieldwork to collect these elements.
The collections will be accompanied by a supporting production of notes, poems, texts or any kind of annotated description of their collection fieldwork experience.
Every evening, a collective meeting will be convened to share the items collected and discuss to further issues.

Plan and timeline of the workshop

On the first morning, each participant comes with questions, images, ideas about her or his fieldwork project. The whole day is devoted to field research: what will be the location/ subject/human demographic they will focus on during the week?
The task will be the same every day: gather a collection of items that represent an idea of care. For that collection, one can chose to explore a single media, or go for a multi-media experiment that ranges from drawing to shooting videos and taking images. – what were the challenges linked to their specific selection? – how can one create a representation of the question of care? This will take the form of a short text, which could be:
- a glossary
- an index
- a poem
- a description of the protocol/technique adopted
- a creative text.

By the end of the afternoon, all the participants will gather and discuss each other’s materials:Each day, students will edit a part of their collection as it grows from one day to the next.

At the end of the week, everyone gets:
1. a photograph, a text, a drawing or a trans-media collection.
2. a map of his/her own process and representation of his/her own thematics.
3. a complete text to explain the work, that integrates the day to day texts accompanying each element/item.

NB: Fieldwork will be encouraged to take place within a manageable working perimeter of the workshop venue to enable participants to freely work back and forth.

Collection methodology during the workshop

Various collection techniques will be possible to pursue:

1) The daily photograph protocol

Take this particular week of your life as an intensive photography week (this could be in video format or blind picture experiment).
Explore the way you look at things. Collect as many impressions as you can.
Test as many things as possible and come and share your collection with others at the evening appointment.

2) The drawing protocol

This experiment will work very effectively with drawings. Try out many different drawing techniques from charcaol to ink.

Draw only single parts or details that make sense to the participant’s understanding of the concept.

Consider drawing as an act of caring.

3) The blind picture protocol

A blind picture is an image memory process.
A person creates an image in his/her mental eye. It is a mental image to share.
To manifest the image’s actual existence, it is has to be documented on paper through the act of a written description.
Once a day, sit somewhere. Observe a situation.
Frame it.
Write it.
Describe it exactly as it would be if you were taking a photograph.
Write every single detail appearing in the frame of your mental eye. At the collective evening meeting, one has to share his blind picture with another who will re-write it.
Compare the two versions of the texts. What has changed?
Talk about your images. Compare them.
Find a form on which you both agree to be a proper version of the blind picture.
Each day collect the 3 versions of the blind pictures.
Take notes on the protocol/technique(s) applied, and how it relates to your difficulty or enjoyment.

4) The mapping protocol

During the workshop, the full experiment is documented in the shape of a mind map.
What are the relationships between places, people, actions, intentions, ideas…?
How do you represent various types of ontologies? (i.e. the ways tings are, become, transform).
The mind map can integrate images, photographs and drawings. It can be colored or black and white.
It can evolve by simple expansion or through layering.

selfportrait, Chennai, 2008

About the artist

Anne Dubos is an anthropologist and a transmedia artist. Her research focuses on both fundamental objects (such as Indian aesthetics, cognition, praxeology) and the design of experimental devices for theatre and dance. Since 2005, Anne Dubos traces the study of the history of Indian theatres and highlights the variety of techniques of the body of the actor. In search of new paradigms, she questions today the emergence of new theories on perception of movement and cognition. She founded the company Little Heart Movement, in which dancers, actors, digital artists, engineers, computer scientists, singers, musicians, anthropologists, geographers, architects, psychologists and (bio) mechanics collaborate. In Paris as well as in India, she organizes interdisciplinary workshops where each actor is invited to improvise within a recording device, both as author and as an interpreter of the trace that it forms with its body within the common space of a collective framework narrative.